Valentine II

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Information.png This page is about the Soviet Lend-Lease Valentine. The British Valentine can be found here.



Premium  Valentine II

Icon
USSR Light Tank Tier IV
Battle Tiers
123456789101112
Totals
Cost 1,000  Gold
Hit Points 380380 HP
Weight Limit 15.7/16.915.7/16.9 t
Crew
Commander (Gunner)
Driver
Loader (Radio Operator)
Mobility
Engine Power 140140 hp
Speed Limit 32 km/h
Traverse 5050 deg/s
Power/Wt Ratio 8.928.92 hp/t
Pivot NoNo
Armor
Hull Armor 60/60/60 mm
Turret Armor65/65/6565/65/65 mm
Armament
Damage 35.3-58.835.3-58.8 HP
Penetration 38-6438-64 mm
Rate of Fire
26.25100% crew: 27.38 rpm
+ Vents: 27.99 rpm
+ BiA : 28.61 rpm
+ Food: 29.85 rpm
26.25100% crew: 27.38 rpm
+ Vents: 27.99 rpm
+ BiA : 28.61 rpm
+ Food: 29.85 rpm
r/m
Accuracy
0.41100% crew: 0.39 m
+ Vents: 0.39 m
+ BiA : 0.38 m
+ Food: 0.36 m
0.41100% crew: 0.39 m
+ Vents: 0.39 m
+ BiA : 0.38 m
+ Food: 0.36 m
m
Aim time
1.71100% crew: 1.64 s
+ Vents: 1.61 s
+ BiA : 1.57 s
+ Food: 1.51 s
1.71100% crew: 1.64 s
+ Vents: 1.61 s
+ BiA : 1.57 s
+ Food: 1.51 s
s
Turret Traverse
48100% crew: 50.19 deg/s
+ Vents: 51.33 deg/s
+ BiA : 52.46 deg/s
+ Food: 54.73 deg/s
48100% crew: 50.19 deg/s
+ Vents: 51.33 deg/s
+ BiA : 52.46 deg/s
+ Food: 54.73 deg/s
deg/s
Gun Arc 360°
Elevation Arc -6°/+25°-6°/+25°
Ammo Capacity 6161 rounds
General
Chance of Fire 1515 %
View Range
350100% crew: 350 m
+ Vents: 357.5 m
+ BiA : 365 m
+ Food: 380 m
350100% crew: 350 m
+ Vents: 357.5 m
+ BiA : 365 m
+ Food: 380 m
m
Signal Range
570100% crew: 594.43 m
+ Vents: 607.86 m
+ BiA : 621.3 m
+ Food: 648.17 m
570100% crew: 594.43 m
+ Vents: 607.86 m
+ BiA : 621.3 m
+ Food: 648.17 m
m
Parent none
Child none
Research
RT-USSR-Valentine II.jpg
USSR-Valentine LL.png

The Valentine II is a Soviet tier 4 premium light tank.

A British tank supplied to the U.S.S.R. under Lend-Lease. A total of 3,782 vehicles were sent to the Soviet Union, with some lost at sea during transport to Murmansk.

In-game the Valentine is one that was provided to the USSR through the Lend-Lease Act. It's available for purchase in the standard store and was given away as a promotion for joining the 2nd phase of closed beta.


















Modules

Turret
TierNameArmorTraverse SpeedTraverse ArcView RangeXP CostPriceWeight
04IV Valentine II 0065 65/65/65 mm
48100% crew: 50.19 deg/s
+ Vents: 51.33 deg/s
+ BiA : 52.46 deg/s
+ Food: 54.73 deg/s
48100% crew: 50.19 deg/s
+ Vents: 51.33 deg/s
+ BiA : 52.46 deg/s
+ Food: 54.73 deg/s
d/s
360°
350100% crew: 350 m
+ Vents: 357.5 m
+ BiA : 365 m
+ Food: 380 m
350100% crew: 350 m
+ Vents: 357.5 m
+ BiA : 365 m
+ Food: 380 m
m
0------ 0--- 2,000 2,000 kg
Guns compatible with this Turret:
Gun
TierNameAmmoDamagePenetrationShell PriceRate of FireAccuracyAim TimeElevationXP CostPriceWeight
02II 45 mm 20KL 61 47/47/62 HP 51/84/23 mm 14 Credits/2 Gold/14 Credits
26.25100% crew: 27.38 rpm
+ Vents: 27.99 rpm
+ BiA : 28.61 rpm
+ Food: 29.85 rpm
r/m
0.41100% crew: 0.39 m
+ Vents: 0.39 m
+ BiA : 0.38 m
+ Food: 0.36 m
m
1.71100% crew: 1.64 s
+ Vents: 1.61 s
+ BiA : 1.57 s
+ Food: 1.51 s
s
-6°/+25° --- 0--- 0250 250 kg

Engine
TierNamePowerFire ChanceTypeXP CostPriceWeight
03III AES A190 0140 140 hp 015 15 % Diesel --- 0--- 0800 800 kg

Suspension
TierNameLoad LimitTraverse SpeedXP CostPriceWeight
04IV Valentine Mk. II 16.8516.85 t 05050 d/s ------ 0--- 4,000 4,000 kg

Radio
TierNameRangeXP CostPriceWeight
09IX Mk19R
570100% crew: 594.43 m
+ Vents: 607.86 m
+ BiA : 621.3 m
+ Food: 648.17 m
570100% crew: 594.43 m
+ Vents: 607.86 m
+ BiA : 621.3 m
+ Food: 648.17 m
m
0--- --- 0--- 0110 110 kg

Historical Info

image:Valentine_II_Kubinka.jpg|Valentine II in Kubinka

There are several proposed explanations for the name Valentine. According to the most popular one, the design was presented to the War Office on St. Valentine's Day, 14 February 1940, although some sources say that the design was submitted on 10 February. According to another version, the tank was called Valentine in honor of Sir John Valentine Carden, the man who led the development of the A10 and many other Vickers vehicles, and had died three years before. Another version says that Valentine is an acronym for Vickers-Armstrong Ltd Elswick & (Newcastle-upon) Tyne. The "most prosaic" is that it was just an in-house codeword of Vickers with no other significance.

History

The Valentine was an infantry tank produced in the United Kingdom during the Second World War. Acounting for approximately a quarter of wartime British tank production, more than 8,000 of these tanks were produced in 11 different marks, including various purpose-built variants. Over its lifetime, it went from a riveted construction to entirely welded, and from a petrol powerplant to a two-stroke diesel engine produced by GMC, which was less likely to catch fire. It was supplied to the USSR and built under license in Canada. Developed by Vickers, it proved to be both strong and reliable.

Based on the A10 Cruiser tank, the Valentine was privately designed by Vickers-Armstrongs (hence its lack of a General Staff "A" designation) and was submitted to the War Office on 10 February 1938. The development team tried to match the lower weight of a cruiser tank (allowing the suspension and transmission parts of the A10 heavy cruiser to be used) and coupled this with the greater armor of an infantry tank. The result is a very compact vehicle with a cramped interior and two-man turret. Its armor was weaker than the Infantry Tank II Matilda but, due to a weaker engine, the lighter tank had the same top speed. However, the new design was easier to produce and much less expensive.

The War Office was initially deterred by the size of the turret, since they considered a turret crew of three necessary to free the vehicle commander from direct involvement in operating the gun. Concerned by the situation in Europe, however, it finally approved the design in April 1939. The vehicle reached trials in May 1940, which coincided with the loss of much of Britain's materiel in France during the evacuation at Dunkirk. The trials were successful and the vehicle was rushed into production as the Infantry Tank III Valentine. No pilot models were required, as much of the mechanics had been proven on the A10, and it entered service from July 1940.

image:Valentine_mkII-IWM-KID.jpg‎|Valentine In Russia The first Valentines used a petrol engine with conventional steering. The Mark II used a diesel version of the engine, and the Mark IV a GMC diesel: these were the majority of those used in the desert campaigns. Improved tracks were added and the No. 19 Wireless replaced the No. 11. The Valentine remained in production until April 1944, becoming Britain's most-produced tank during the war with 6,855 units manufactured in the UK (by Vickers, Metropolitan-Cammell Carriage and Wagon, and Birmingham Railway Carriage and Wagon), and a further 1,420 in Canada.


Combat history

image:Valentine_Mk3_desert.jpg|VA Valentine in North Africa, carrying infantry from a Scottish regiment The tank first served in Operation Crusader in the North African desert, where it began to replace the Matilda. It was extensively used in the North African Campaign, earning a reputation as a reliable and well-protected vehicle. The Valentine shared the common weakness' of the British tanks of the period: its 2-pounder gun lacked high-explosive (anti-personnel) capability, and soon became outdated as an anti-tank weapon as well. The small size of the turret and turret ring made mounting larger guns a difficult task. Although versions with the 6-pounder, and then with the Ordnance QF 75 mm gun were developed, by the time they were available in significant numbers, better tanks had reached the battlefield. Another weakness was the small crew compartment and the turret for only two men. A larger turret with a loader position added was used in some of the 2-pounder versions, but the position had to be removed again in variants with larger guns. By 1944, the Valentine had been almost completely replaced in front-line units of the European Theatre by the Infantry Tank IV Churchill and the US-made Sherman. In the Pacific, the tank was employed in limited numbers at least until May 1945. It was used in New Zealand's service, some with the main armament replaced by the 3 inch howitzer taken from Australian Matilda CS tanks.[citation needed], on the Solomons in 1943. In Soviet service, the Valentine was used from the Battle of Moscow until the end of the war. Although criticized for its low speed and weak gun, the Valentine was liked due to its small size, reliability, and generally-good armor protection.

Lend Lease

The Valentine was the Commonwealth's main export to the Soviet Union under the Lend-lease Act, with 2,394 of the British models and 1,388 of the Canadian Pacific-built models being sent: the remaining 30 being kept for training. Typically, Lend-Lease vehicles were worse than modern Soviets ones. However, at the same time, the USSR also used even more obsolete tanks and planes.
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