Hotchkiss H35

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Hotchkiss H35

Icon
France Light Tank Tier II
Battle Tiers
123456789101112
Totals
Cost 4,200  Credits
Hit Points 140140 HP
Weight Limit 9.5/9.69.437/10.5 t
Crew
Commander (Gunner, Radio Operator, Loader)
Driver
Mobility
Engine Power 7582 hp
Speed Limit 27 km/h
Traverse 3234 deg/s
Power/Wt Ratio 7.898.69 hp/t
Pivot NoNo
Armor
Hull Armor 40/40/40 mm
Turret Armor40/40/4040/40/40 mm
Armament
Damage 22.5-37.520.3-33.8 HP
Penetration 22-3635-58 mm
Rate of Fire
24100% crew: 25.03 rpm
+ Vents: 25.59 rpm
+ BiA : 26.16 rpm
+ Food: 27.29 rpm
28.57100% crew: 29.8 rpm
+ Vents: 30.47 rpm
+ BiA : 31.14 rpm
+ Food: 32.49 rpm
r/m
Accuracy
0.54100% crew: 0.52 m
+ Vents: 0.51 m
+ BiA : 0.5 m
+ Food: 0.47 m
0.45100% crew: 0.43 m
+ Vents: 0.42 m
+ BiA : 0.41 m
+ Food: 0.4 m
m
Aim time
2100% crew: 1.92 s
+ Vents: 1.88 s
+ BiA : 1.83 s
+ Food: 1.76 s
1.5100% crew: 1.44 s
+ Vents: 1.41 s
+ BiA : 1.38 s
+ Food: 1.32 s
s
Turret Traverse
32100% crew: 33.37 deg/s
+ Vents: 34.13 deg/s
+ BiA : 34.88 deg/s
+ Food: 36.39 deg/s
32100% crew: 33.37 deg/s
+ Vents: 34.13 deg/s
+ BiA : 34.88 deg/s
+ Food: 36.39 deg/s
deg/s
Gun Arc 360°
Elevation Arc -13°/+20°-5°/+16°
Ammo Capacity 100160 rounds
General
Chance of Fire 2020 %
View Range
300100% crew: 300 m
+ Vents: 306.43 m
+ BiA : 312.86 m
+ Food: 325.71 m
300100% crew: 300 m
+ Vents: 306.43 m
+ BiA : 312.86 m
+ Food: 325.71 m
m
Signal Range
300100% crew: 312.86 m
+ Vents: 319.93 m
+ BiA : 327 m
+ Food: 341.14 m
360100% crew: 375.43 m
+ Vents: 383.91 m
+ BiA : 392.4 m
+ Food: 409.37 m
m
Parent Contour-France-Renault FT.png
Child
Contour-France-AMX 38.png1,260 XP
Research
RT-France-Hotchkiss H35.jpg
Values are Stock - click for Top
France-Hotchkiss H35.png

The Hotchkiss H35 is a French tier 2 light tank.

Cavalry support tank. Developed in 1934. Mass production was launched in 1935, with a total of 400 vehicles manufactured. In 1938 a new modification, the H38, entered production. About 1000 of the H35/H38/H39 vehicles were produced.

In a tier filled with fast and agile tanks, the H35, along with its German premium counterpart the Pz.Kpfw. 38H 735 (f) and the other French Tier 2 tank, the D1, stands out with its exceptionally thick armor and relatively low mobility. It is particularly well-suited to leading assaults or locking down avenues of approach, especially with the support of the team.

The Hotchkiss H35 leads to the AMX 38.


















Modules

Turret
TierNameArmorTraverse SpeedTraverse ArcView RangeXP CostPriceWeight
01I APX R 0040 40/40/40 mm
32100% crew: 33.37 deg/s
+ Vents: 34.13 deg/s
+ BiA : 34.88 deg/s
+ Food: 36.39 deg/s
32100% crew: 33.37 deg/s
+ Vents: 34.13 deg/s
+ BiA : 34.88 deg/s
+ Food: 36.39 deg/s
d/s
360°
300100% crew: 300 m
+ Vents: 306.43 m
+ BiA : 312.86 m
+ Food: 325.71 m
300100% crew: 300 m
+ Vents: 306.43 m
+ BiA : 312.86 m
+ Food: 325.71 m
m
0------ 0--- 0900 900 kg
Guns compatible with this Turret:
Gun
TierNameAmmoDamagePenetrationShell PriceRate of FireAccuracyAim TimeElevationXP CostPriceWeight
01I 37 mm APX SA18 100 30/30/36 HP 29/46/18 mm 0 Credits/2 Gold/6 Credits
24100% crew: 25.03 rpm
+ Vents: 25.59 rpm
+ BiA : 26.16 rpm
+ Food: 27.29 rpm
r/m
0.54100% crew: 0.52 m
+ Vents: 0.51 m
+ BiA : 0.5 m
+ Food: 0.47 m
m
2100% crew: 1.92 s
+ Vents: 1.88 s
+ BiA : 1.83 s
+ Food: 1.76 s
s
-13°/+20° --- 0000000000 Credits 0100 100 kg
02II 37 mm SA38 100 40/40/45 HP 34/67/24 mm 14 Credits/2 Gold/10 Credits
19.35100% crew: 20.18 rpm
+ Vents: 20.64 rpm
+ BiA : 21.1 rpm
+ Food: 22.01 rpm
r/m
0.48100% crew: 0.46 m
+ Vents: 0.45 m
+ BiA : 0.44 m
+ Food: 0.42 m
m
2100% crew: 1.92 s
+ Vents: 1.88 s
+ BiA : 1.83 s
+ Food: 1.76 s
s
-10°/+13° 75 1,8901,890 Credits 0070 70 kg
02II 25 mm Canon Raccourci Mle. 1934 160 27/27 HP 46/68 mm 5 Credits/2 Gold
28.57100% crew: 29.8 rpm
+ Vents: 30.47 rpm
+ BiA : 31.14 rpm
+ Food: 32.49 rpm
r/m
0.45100% crew: 0.43 m
+ Vents: 0.42 m
+ BiA : 0.41 m
+ Food: 0.4 m
m
1.5100% crew: 1.44 s
+ Vents: 1.41 s
+ BiA : 1.38 s
+ Food: 1.32 s
s
-5°/+16° 150 2,3202,320 Credits 0071 71 kg

Engine
TierNamePowerFire ChanceTypeXP CostPriceWeight
01I Hotchkiss 35 0075 75 hp 020 20 % Gasoline --- 000000400400 Credits 0266 266 kg
02II Renault V4 0082 82 hp 020 20 % Gasoline 85 000000480480 Credits 0266 266 kg

Suspension
TierNameLoad LimitTraverse SpeedXP CostPriceWeight
01I H35 09.69.6 t 03232 d/s ------ 000000250250 Credits 3,000 3,000 kg
02II H39 10.510.5 t 03434 d/s 09595 000000560560 Credits 3,000 3,000 kg

Radio
TierNameRangeXP CostPriceWeight
03III ER 52
300100% crew: 312.86 m
+ Vents: 319.93 m
+ BiA : 327 m
+ Food: 341.14 m
300100% crew: 312.86 m
+ Vents: 319.93 m
+ BiA : 327 m
+ Food: 341.14 m
m
0--- --- 000000600600 Credits 0100 100 kg
05V ER 53
360100% crew: 375.43 m
+ Vents: 383.91 m
+ BiA : 392.4 m
+ Food: 409.37 m
360100% crew: 375.43 m
+ Vents: 383.91 m
+ BiA : 392.4 m
+ Food: 409.37 m
m
0610 610 3,6503,650 Credits 0100 100 kg

Historical Info

In 1926, the French Infanterie decided to provide armour support to the regular infantry divisions by creating autonomous tank battalions equipped with a light and cheap infantry tank, a char d'accompagnement. For this role at first the Renault Char D1 was developed, but it proved to be neither particularly light nor cheap. In 1933, the company Hotchkiss et Cie, under its own initiative, presented a plan to produce a lighter design through the application of new manufacturing techniques to produce cast steel sections to construct an entire hull. Hotchkiss et Cie was a French arms manufacturer established by American gunsmith Benjamin B. Hotchkiss, who had learned his trade at Colt and Winchester in Connecticut. Hotchkiss moved to France in 1867 and set up his own gun factory at Viviez near Rodez. In 1875 he moved it to Saint-Denis near Paris.

On 30 June 1933, the Hotchkiss proposal was approved by the Conseil Consultatif de l'Armement. On 2 August 1933 the new tank's specifications were made known: a weight of six tonnes and 30 mm armor thickness all around. Three prototypes were ordered from Hotchkiss, but the entire French industry was also invited to provide alternative proposals. This allowed the Renault company to beat Hotchkiss in delivering their first prototype, which was later developed into the Renault R35. On 18 January 1935, the first Hotchkiss prototype, not yet made of armor plating, was presented to the Commission d'Expérience du Matériel Automobile (CEMA) at Vincennes; it was a turretless machine gun-armed tankette. It was tested until 4 March 1935, when it was replaced by a second identical prototype to be tested until 6 May. Both had to be rejected because new specifications had been made on 21 June 1934 that increased the desired armor thickness to 40 mm.

On 27 June 1935, the commission approved the type on the provision that the necessary changes were made. On 19 August, a third prototype was delivered, equipped with a cast APX turret and featuring a redesigned hull; it was tested until 20 September and accepted for service as the Char léger modèle 1935 H. On 6 November, a first order was made for 200 vehicles. The first production vehicle was delivered on 12 September 1936. That same year, two additional orders had already been made of 92 and 108 vehicles respectively. By 1 January 1937, 132 vehicles had been produced.

The first series production vehicle was again extensively and intensively tested until 4 December 1936. This showed that its handling qualities on rough terrain were unacceptably poor. It was simply impossible to safely steer the vehicle on a somewhat rough surface, posing an extreme danger to nearby friendly infantry. The Infanterie therefore decided to accept only the first 100 tanks to equip just two battalions with the type: the 13e and 38e Bataillon de Chars de Combat and reject any further procurement.

For political reasons, however, stopping production of the tank was not acceptable. And so the other 300 vehicles of the production run were offered to the Cavalerie, which was forced to accept them because it would not have been granted a budget for other tanks anyway. As the cavalry units would be making more use of the road network and of mounted infantry, its cross-country handling problems were of less consequence. The H35 was, at 28 km/h, also somewhat faster than the Renault R35, which was capable of 20 km/h, although in practice its average speed was lower than that of the R35 because of its inferior gear box.

The H35 was a rather compact tank, being 4.22 m long, 1.95 m wide and 2.15 m tall, and weighing around 11 metric tons. The armor was made completely of cast steel in six parts that were bolted together. The armor was also well sloped to increase the chance of deflection and the tank was equipped with a six cylinder 78hp engine. The crew consisted of only two members, the driver and the commander who had to take the duties of Radioman, Gunner and Loader as well. The driver did not have it any easier as the vehicle was difficult to drive as the gearbox and brakes were weak and prone to malfunction. The tank was initially equipped with the short 37mm SA18 gun that had only 23 mm of armor penetration, too light to even pierce the H35's own armor and completely inadequate in the anti-tank role.

In 1939, an upgraded variant with a 120 hp engine, an improved suspension and tracks and, eventually in 1940, an improved 37 mm SA38 gun was produced as the Char léger modèle 1935 H modifié 39 or H39.

Operational History

The poor cross-country performance of the original model led to the intended users of the H35, the infantry, rejecting it. This led to the cavalry regiments receiving the original batch of tanks and requesting the increased speed that the H39 variant eventually delivered.

By the beginning of the Second World War, 640 Hotchkiss tanks of various variants were delivered to various arms of the the French army. The Hotchkiss tanks proved themselves during the battle of Flavion and, most notably, during battle of Stonne (also known as the "Verdun of 1940") in which they, along with Char B1 heavy tanks, permitted outnumbered French forces to resist the German assault for three days, inflicting heavy losses. The Germans captured 550 of them after the fall of France. Most of these units were used for policing and training roles, though some saw action in Yugoslavia and during the Normandy Campaign. Some H39s were also used as a conversion base for the Marder I tank destroyer.
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